Amnesty

A measure of clemency that the authorities in power are invited by the law of armed conflict to grant as widely as possible at the end of hostilities in a non-international armed conflict to persons who participated in the conflict or are detained or interned for reasons related thereto.
 
 

 OUTLINE

 LEGAL SOURCE

Amnesty to persons who have participated in armed conflict

   PII, 6/5; CIHL, 159

 CASES

 BIBLIOGRAPHIC RESOURCES

BOED Roman, “The Effect of a Domestic Amnesty on the Ability of Foreign States to Prosecute Alleged Perpetrators of Serious Human Rights Violations”, in Cornell International Law Journal, Vol. 33/2, 2000, pp. 297-329.
 
DUGARD John, “Dealing with Crimes of Past Regime. Is Amnesty still an Option?”, in LeidenJournal of International Law, Vol. 12/4, 1999, pp. 1001-1015.
 
GAVRON Jessica, “Amnesties in the Light of Developments in International Law and the Establishment of the International Criminal Court”, in ICLQ, Vol. 51/1, 2002, pp. 91-117.
 
MACDONALD Avril, “Sierra Leone’s Uneasy Peace: The Amnesties Granted in the Lomé Peace Agreement and the United Nations’ Dilemma”, in Humanitäres Völkerrecht, Vol. 13/1, 2000, pp. 11-26.
 
MEINTJES Garth & MÉNDEZ Juan E., “Reconciling Amnesties with Universal Jurisdiction”, in International Law Forum, Vol. 2/2, 2000, pp. 76-97.